Spotting the Difference between Low Back Pain and Kidney Pain

Questions frequently arise when pain in the back occurs. Oftentimes, the sufferers and even the physicians themselves are not certain of the actual site of the pain’s origin. Since lower back pain radiates into the other sections of the body, people tend to become unsure of how to provide initial relief on themselves and how would doctors diagnose the condition.

This is quite misleading and physicians who cannot find the exact location of the pain dismiss the case and assume that it is more of psychological rather than physiological.

To further complicate things, we may never really find the actual site of pain and the primary cause that triggered the pain. Let us assume that it really is a back pain, say in the lower back. We could have given treatment on this but what if it really was not originally a lower back pain. What if it rooted from the kidneys? What if the pain is actually a manifestation of kidney complications? How then would you tell the difference?

Though this may seem like an oversimplification, let us establish still that lower back kidney pain is more concentrated on the areas where the kidneys lie. That is located slightly above the hips and positioned next to the spine.

Any injury created on the surface of the back that is directly covering the area where the kidneys are founded may have adverse effect on the kidneys themselves. This is the reason why trauma or any excessive force over the area is betterly recognized as “kidney punch” rather than lower back pain.

Kidney pain is directly linked to the organ itself but may usually manifest as lower back pain. It is acute in origin because the pain typically starts rapidly but may develop into chronic pain over time. However, the pain will only last as long as the kidney is infected. Chronic pain on the other hand is usually caused by the trauma on the back.

If initial symptoms will be used as the basis for diagnosing lower back kidney pain, evidences are clear that they show similarities with lower back pain. Yet a traumatized back is not relatively painful when pushed directly on the region of the kidney.

But there are other indications that may show clear distinctions between lower back kidney pain and kidney pain alone. These may include painful urination, chills and fever, and presence of blood in the urine.

With the initial signs of lower back kidney pain, it is commonly advised that the patient sees his or her doctor immediately. To provide treatment plan as early as possible